Visualize!

Visualize!

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Do you want to visualize insights, processes, lessons learnt?​

Sometimes an image can tell more than 1000 words. The tools recommended below give you an idea about how to make use of the power of visuals.

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​​​​​​​​​ Digital Storytelling

What?

Digital storytelling is the practice of combining a personal story with digital media. The videos normally are no longer than 2-4 minutes and can include photographs, video clips, images, sound and a recorded voice-over.

When
to use?

Digital Storytelling can be used for many different purposes. It is a tool to foster reflection because the storyteller has to think deeply about the content and the message to convey in a short video. It also supports learning processes and can bring out hidden knowledge. It is possible to use storytelling for an Experience Capitalization. Afterwards, the videos can easily be disseminated for further exchange. Moreover, the personal story allows giving voice and visibility to individuals. Finally, it can also be used as a communication tool and for PR.

How?

 

1 - 3 days, depending
on previous knowledge

 

everyone produces one's own story

 

visuals and sound files, editing program, computer

For every digital story the production process begins with the reflection about a personal story. It is helpful to exchange with others, i.e. in a story circle to learn from each other and to receive valuable inputs. It is important to dedicate enough time to develop a concise script. Once the script is finalized the voice-over can be recorded. Following, the storyteller assembles the other visual and sound elements. With an editing program (www.wevideo.com, imovie, Nero Video, Final Cut Pro, Adobe Premiere etc.) the different pieces are brought together to produce the short video.

Why?

A digital story lets people express themselves not only with their own words but also in their own voices, fostering a sense of ownership. The process of crafting a story requires the storyteller to think carefully about the content. A good digital story can facilitate the comprehension of complex situations and makes the essence visible.

Being touched by the personal stories of others can trigger own reflection and finally lead to action. 

 
 

Graphic Recording/ Graphic Facilitation

What?

Graphic Recording and Graphic Facilitation are sometimes used interchangeably. However, there are important differences.

The graphic recorders are artists who listen to a speaker and transcribe the information visually. They create live large, wall-size documents during gatherings and meetings. Usually the recorder is doing silently his or her best to translate what is being spoken about into an attractive visual summary. Graphic recording captures the conversation and energy of the group, and therefore providing a record of ideas and agreements that may otherwise be difficult to follow.

The Graphic Facilitation is more interactive, it combines skilled facilitation with the benefits of graphic recording: big-picture, visual displays to support collaborative communication. Graphic facilitation can either be provided by a true graphic facilitator (someone who designs and leads an event AND takes the visual notes at the same time) or a graphic facilitation team (a lead facilitator and one or several graphic recorders). Using these techniques, a shared picture for groups is created to literally see what they are saying, uncover previously unseen patterns of behavior, align to agreed-upon objectives and move to action. It is a very interactive process, as the charts are created in front of everyone's eyes and through everyone's words.

When
to use?

Graphic Recorders can work as a recording service for summaries of the key messages of speakers at conferences, or executives or leaders to graphically facilitate for strategic planning and company visioning. Graphic recording is best used when the topic is a general and easily tracked nature. It is not useful for highly detailed situation. For those situations, it is best to default to graphic facilitation methods.

How?

A Graphic Recorder keeps people engaged. The process starts with identifying the desired outcomes of the meeting, captures the main ideas from expert presentations delivered at live events and turns them into memorable and eye-catching visual summaries. To create this visual content, graphic recorders listen for key ideas in a conversation. They are trained to recognize verbal cues to identify these key ideas and quickly replicate them through drawings. This skill helps them to capture the essence of a live presentation in a short amount of time. Graphic recordings are so fresh, that much of their appeal resides in watching the process itself unfold.

Graphic Recorders often prefer to not to know beforehand the presentation materials, as they are then focused on certain expectations.

Why?

Working visually is attractive – a large part of the general population are visual thinkers. Some people are better able to translate (and recall) information when visuals are involved. Graphic recordings' combination of pictures and words is novel, compelling and memorable.

Want
to know
more?

See also the Blog of the father of graphic recording/facilitation - Dave Sibbet and a retrospect to the development of graphic recording/facilitation.

More videos you can find here:
Essential tools for graphic facilitation and visual vocabulary

Participatory Video

What?

Participatory Video is a way for people to make their voices heard. It benefits from the fact that video is an excellent form of communication and one that is becoming increasingly accessible. People are taught basic skills necessary for conceptualizing and creating their own videos. These videos are then introduced to a larger audience. Participatory Video promotes engagement of people who might otherwise be marginalised.

When
to use?

PV is used in groups or communities, to help them address issues, tell their stories, or simply be creative and communicate.

How?

 

Several days for teaching and editing

 

Lager groups
communities

 

Video equipment, editing software, PC

Participants are taught basic video skills through games and exercises. Facilitators help the group identify and analyze the issues that are important to the group. They think about the subjects and the audience. Short videos and messages are directed, filmed and edited by the participants. The videos are then shared with the wider community, online or through screenings.

Why?

Participatory Video teaches people basic video skills. This empowers them to share their own message while having full editorial control. Because video is such an effective form of communication it builds bridges between communities and makes voices heard that would otherwise not be. It is a creative way to engage and mobilize marginalised people and to address local, environmental, social and political issues.

Want
to know
more?

Visualization

What?

Visualization is a means to make presentations and discussions, and thus sharing of information and knowledge more efficient and effective. The spoken word is supported by a visual representation (text, pictures, graphics, etc.). The most frequently used means of visualization in meetings are beamer or overhead projector for presentations, and charts or cards for recording discussions. And not to forget the strengths of objects such as stones, figures, wood, grains, etc. that are powerful visualization tools in a discussion with non-literate people.

When
to use?

Visualization …

  • helps to stay focused on the point under discussion,

  • makes the content easier to remember,

  • forces the speaker to prepare his/her input in advance using precise and concrete arguments,

  • reduces emotional implications in a heated discussion,

  • serves as documentation by recording statements, ideas, results and to-do lists.

How?

Rules of Visualization:

Write legibly! Check font size, density, contrast; block lettering, distance between letters and words.

Use colours restrictively! White chart paper increases legibility. Use black markers for general text and coloured ones for special effects and decoration. If using pin-board cards, select pastel-coloured cards.

Let posters speak for themselves! Put an attractive title on top or in the centre. Structure your poster to guide the eye (titles, paragraphs, bullets, boxes, mind-map format, etc.). Take the reading direction into account (top to bottom or from centre outwards). Be aware of the saying: "If the eye is not attracted, the feet will pass by."

Use a simple language. Avoid abbreviations.

Install technical equipment before the meeting! Check if it is running properly. Verify the legibility of the visualization.

Why?

Key messages, key questions, steps in a process, and important contribu­tions of discussions are clearer and get more weight with a good visualization. It is easier to absorb the content of a presentation if it is visualized.

Want
to know
more?

Comprehensive Text about Visualization

Watch this video for getting started with drawing your first visual elements. More about Visual thinking und find here.

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